How to Keep Mice Out of Your Home and Garage

Written by on October 2, 2011 in At the Homestead - 54 Comments
mouse-in-the-house

This post is by guest blogger Laurie Neverman of Common Sense Homesteading. If you are interested in guest writing for Wild Sage Homestead, contact Rob Russo today!

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While we prep for cold weather, animals do, too. Fall is prime time for an increase in rodent activity in your home. While small, mice and rats can cause big problems. They chew on everything, causing property damage and potential fire risks when they gnaw on electrical wiring and build tinder dry nests in dark corners. They can spread disease, on their own, through the parasites they carry (their fleas carried the Black Plague) or through their droppings (such as hantavirus).

How to Tell if You Have Mice in Your Home

It’s probably more common to see mouse droppings or mouse damage before you see the mice themselves, as they are nocturnal. When I was a kid, the little buggers would dry me crazy at night running around up in the attic. Thankfully we didn’t get rats in the house, but they would sometimes show up in the outbuildings around the farm.

Identifying Droppings and Urine

Killum Pest Control offers an excellent online guide to interpreting rodent signs. Please visit their site for more information, but I’ll just share briefly their comments on dropping and urine identification.

Droppings. Fresh droppings of feces usually are moist, soft, shiny and dark, but in a few days they become dry and hard. Old droppings are dull and grayish and crumble when pressed with a stick. The roof rat’s droppings are up to 1/2 inch long, spindle shaped and curved in contrast to Norway rat droppings which are about the same length but comparatively blunt. Mouse feces are small, averaging about 1/8 inch long, and are pointed on both ends.

Urine. Dried rodent urine will fluoresce bluish white to yellowish white. Commercial black lights often are used to detect rodent urine, however observing fluorescence is not a guarantee that rodent urine is present. Numerous items will fluoresce under a black light, including optical bleaches found in many detergents and lubricating oil. For positive identification use a Brom Thymol Blue Urease Test. Place the suspected material on Urease-Brom Thymol-Blue test paper. Moisten with water and cover with a glass. If a bluish spot appears after 3 to 5 minutes, it is rodent urine.

Mice commonly mark their trails with urine (yes, I know, you probably didn’t really want to know that…) so that other mice can follow their tracks to food sources. One source I read said that they produce 50-60 droppings per night – ewwww… Once you’ve found their way into your home, you need to block it, otherwise they be right back in via the pee track highway. They can climb, too – like mini rodent ninjas.

You may also find food stashes and nests in out of the way corners. I remember finding a mouse nest in the back of an old school desk in my room. Gnawing damage is another dead giveaway. My mom had a cardboard box of old cooking magazines inside a wooden cabinet, and the mini rodent ninjas still found their way in and chewed the edges of the magazines.

How to Keep Mice Out of Your Home

To keep these critters out and keep your family safe and your goods protected, follow these simple steps.

  • Remove Food Sources
    Bird food, pet food and other edible odds and ends (even cardboard) that tend to pile up in garages are like mouse nirvana. Crumbs under the couch are a gourmet treat, and a cookie lost by toddler is a mouse family buffet. Seal all food (for pets or humans) in solid containers, not just in bags. (Rats can and will chew through plastic bins, so be warned. You need to use metal containers to keep them out.) Plastic garbage cans or Rubbermaid tubs will generally keep mice out. Clean, clean, clean! Gaps between appliances like stoves or refrigerators and cabinets can collect crumbs where they are difficult for you to clean, but handy for mice to dine. Remember, if they can get their heads into a space, their bodies can get in, too.
  • Seal Openings
    This is the probably the toughest but most effective way to keep mice out – seal openings. As I mentioned above, if a mouse can get its head though, the body can go through as well. The little pests only need about a ¼ inch (0.6 cm) wide opening. They can jump – up to 18 inches (I told you – mini rodent ninjas), travel upside down (you bet), and crawl along an electrical wire (piece of cake). If you can stick a #2 pencil through a hole, a mouse can probably use it to get into your home.

    When you find holes, you want to try and seal them as strongly as possible. The Internet Center for Wildlife Damage Management recommends:

    Steel wool, copper gauze (Stuf-it® brand) or screen wire packed tightly into openings is a good temporary plug. For long-term or permanent repair, mix a quick-drying patching plaster or anchoring such as Fixall® into a wad of Stuf-it® before pushing the material into the hole, and smooth over the outside. If steel wool is used, rust stains are likely to result. Holes 3 inches (8 cm) or more in diameter should be covered or backed with 1/4-inch (0.6-cm) woven/welded hardware cloth prior to filling with a good patching compound. Another backing material available is Strong PatchTM (D. P. Wagner Mfg. Inc.), a 6 x 6-inch (15 x 15-cm) sheet metal patch to cover holes up to 5 x 5 inches (11 x 11 cm). It has a self-adhesive backing and a mesh on the surface for better adhesion of the patching compound or other texture.

    Visit their site for diagrams and more extensive information on making outbuildings more rodent resistant.

  • Reduce Outside Habitat
    If possible, reduce the amount of mouse habitat outside your home to reduce the number of mice inside your home. Trim trees and shrubs away from the home. Clean up debris, brush piles, and other hiding spots where mice may take cover. Keep your compost bin(s) as tidy as possible (opossums and rats like to raid the compost, too). I saw one site recommend moving wood piles 100 feet from the house and raising them one foot off the ground. Obviously they don’t live in Wisconsin. The mice will have to stay in the wood pile – their nests make great tinder.

Best Ways to Remove Mice that Are Already in Your Home

Your three main options are cats, traps and poison. I’ve come to love my kitties, but it’s not practical for everyone to have a cat or cats in the house, and not all cats are good mousers. (I’ve had friends tell me about their cats who watch the mice run right past them.) Poisons do work, but not immediately. The mice will crawl off and die somewhere and potentially smell really nasty, plus who wants mummified mice sitting around their house? Poisons can also be a danger to children and pets. I remember when my eldest found some ant poison I had put in the back of the closet when he was a toddler. He was fine – Terro is not toxic in small amounts – but it gave me a good scare.

Your basic wooden trap is cheap and readily available, but can sometimes be hit or miss. A friend of mine was complaining recently that her mice kept stealing the bait but not getting caught in the trap. Two new trap types that look promising to me are Jawz Easy To Set Plastic Mouse Trap and Kness SNAP-E Mousetrap. I haven’t tried them yet, but the online reviews are very good. Humane traps are also available, but one site states that you need to take your mouse at least two miles away to make sure it will not return. I am not a mouse chauffeur, and I don’t think it’s right to share my mice with my neighbors.

My mom’s favorite bait was peanut butter, which they can’t grab and carry off. When you’re placing traps, try to put them along walls where you believe mice are moving. Block their path with a buffet of your choosing instead of letting them into your cupboards. Two traps side by side are better than one, as they will have a tougher time escaping both (remember – mini rodent ninjas). Set the traps perpendicular to the wall (see photo). Check traps daily, empty and reset as needed. Odor from one mouse may help attract the next mouse, but having a deceased mouse hanging around doesn’t do anyone any favors.

How to Safely Clean Up After Mice

Because of the risk of hantavirus and other illnesses, care should be taken when cleaning up mouse droppings/remains, especially in quantity and/or in enclosed areas. (Information adapted from Environment, Health and Safety Online.)

  • Wear gloves, either rubber gloves or work gloves you can wash in hot water
  • Spray the droppings first with 3% hydrogen peroxide, then with white vinegar. This will kill 99% of bacteria. A bleach water solution or disinfectant is also and option.
  • Wipe up droppings with a paper towel, throw towel in garbage
  • Clean area with disinfectant solution or hydrogen peroxide/vinegar combo
  • Wash hands with soap and water before and after removing gloves

If dealing with large amounts of droppings, you may need professional help, or at the very least please wear a face mask. Please be careful! Your county extension office may be able to provide more information on any known rodent related disease outbreaks in your area.

Treat nesting materials and dead mice similarly. Always wash hands thoroughly after touching contaminated materials.

I hope you find this article useful. If so, please share it with your friends. Don’t forget to stop by and visit Common Sense Homesteading.

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Laurie Neverman, Common Sense HomesteadingLaurie Neverman was raised on a Northwest Wisconsin dairy farm where frugality and providing food for the family were a way a life. Now she lives with her family in Kewaunee County in a green home they designed and built. On 35 acres, the family tends to large organic gardens containing over 100 varieties of fruits and vegetables, most of which are heirlooms. They freeze, water bath can, pressure can, dry, and ferment to preserve food, and use the root cellar, cool storage, cold frames, and green house to extend the harvest without additional energy inputs.

Laurie has written for a number of local and national publications including Taste of Home and Countryside magazines, The Healthy Independent and Healthy Thoughts.

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About the Author

Designer Rob Russo loves to work and play on the homestead with his wife, Jes, their three daughters and a big flock of chickens. He blogs about social media design and marketing at DesignerRobRusso.com and is the marketing director of HelloScent.com. You should follow Rob on Twitter.

54 Comments on "How to Keep Mice Out of Your Home and Garage"

  1. kathy October 3, 2011 at 6:12 am · Reply

    We used DeCon on my grandmother’s house after she moved to the nursing home- no pets in the house. After she passed away we cleaned everything out of the house and I was peeling dried mice out of the backs of cabinets! It was our best method since she lived hours away but if you don’t want to find this, and you live close, I would avoid the chemicals.

  2. April October 3, 2011 at 10:44 am · Reply

    Good post! When I was a young homemaker, I had my firs experience with mice, my husband worked a very early job, so I was sitting out in the living room in the very early hours of the day, and was surprised when a little tiny most ran out in front of me. A little sleuthing and I found that the little thing had taken up residence in the back of my pantry where there was a hollow wall space. So I cleaned out the whole pantry, replaced a ll of my items and put them in storage totes, hubby went on the hunt, along with our chubby cat (no wonder he didn’t try for mice, he was full :) And we got rid of them. In my country property I kept many barn cats, so they weren’t such a problem, In our new home we have had a little visitor from time to time in the garage, o I have a no cardboard box rule and keep up spilled dog food.

    Great post, information everyone needs to know :) ~April

  3. April October 3, 2011 at 10:46 am · Reply

    sorry, a little tiny Mouse, not most? That’s what I get for replying on blogs before 8:00 am :) ~April

  4. Carol October 3, 2011 at 12:34 pm · Reply

    Great post. We have trapped a couple mice in our kitchen. Oh dear, it was icky to read about the trail they leave for other mice. We need to find their entry place.

    For many years we had 2 cats. One was an excellent mouser the other one like to watch. She could spot them and watch with fascination but nothing more.

  5. Connie October 3, 2011 at 2:50 pm · Reply

    I will definitely be book marking this post…and re-reading it again and again. I am terrified of mice and rats…oh boy…just gives me goosebumps typing this.

  6. Lorrie October 5, 2011 at 12:40 pm · Reply

    Cat,s traps and poison are right…my cats are a sad excuse for mousers so we stick to the traps. We use peanut butter, too.

  7. Sibyl White October 5, 2011 at 1:28 pm · Reply

    When I was a little girl, my mother found some baby mice in our house. She wanted to kill them and I begged and cried and pitched a royal fit to let me take them away and give them a chance. She broke down and allowed me to do that. I took them to a field next to our house and let them go. They were back in no time. I know better now.

  8. Julie Weishaar October 5, 2011 at 1:44 pm · Reply

    I have seen my fair share of mouse droppings over the years – but thank goodness – not lately. I am hoping I don’t need this good advice in the near future :)

  9. Anita October 5, 2011 at 1:53 pm · Reply

    I have had trouble over the years with mice and have always just used traps. I am personally terrified of mice…I know…such a little critter sends me screaming and to the table top….I would sooner meet a bear!

  10. Elise Adams @AdamsOrganizing October 5, 2011 at 3:50 pm · Reply

    Just discovered a fury friend in our basement laundry room the other day…so far he/she hasn’t taken the bait. Guess I’ll have to try some extra creative methods. Any ideas for getting rid of mice when they won’t trip the trap? I’ve seen this one several times (hope it’s just one) but so far no droppings or anything so I assume he’s coming in because of the weather change and nearby heavy construction in a local field. :-(

    • Debbie August 9, 2012 at 2:53 am · Reply

      This method is more for the barn or a garage but could also work in a basement or attic. It’s not one of those humane relocation traps but if you have a real infestation, you need something that will catch lots of mice in a hurry. Get a plastic 5 gallon bucket, drill holes through the top on each side. Make the same size holes in a beer or soda can. Cut a wooden dowel a little longer than the width of the top of the open bucket and make sure it will easily slide through the holes in the bucket maybe a little snugger through the can. Slide the dowel though one side of the bucket, then push it through the top and bottom of the can, then through the hole on the other side. Make sure it can turn easily in the bucket holes. Put two nails or screws into the end of a small board- your ‘gangplank’- so that they anchor the wood in place. How far you push the board over the edge of the bucket depends how close you want to get that board to the can. The idea is to coat a stripe of peanut butter around the middle of the can. The mouse walks up the gangplank, hops to the can to get the peanut butter, it rotates, the mouse falls into the bucket and it’s ready for mouse number two, three, four, and so on. You must put water in the bottom of the bucket and yes, they will drown. If using in the winter, you can add antifreeze but make sure it’s the kind that won’t harm your pets, just keep it from freezing solid. You can catch up to 30 mice in a night with this. They don’t build up resistance to poison, it doesn’t need to be reset, just add more peanut butter. And it works. Unfortunately, you have to look at your deed and empty the dead mice into a hole and bury them or scoop them out. For those who say, Oh! How cruel!, they are infesting your house, putting you and your livestock in danger, and mousetraps are just as cruel when they only snap a leg. Certainly not as terrible as the glue traps. Remember, secure the gangplank, add 2-3 inches of water to the bottom of the bucket or they WILL get out, and keep it from freezing in the winter. You may have to adjust the inches the gangplank sticks over the edge of the bucket to make sure the critters don’t just reach over and lick the peanut butter off from safety!

  11. Solvita October 5, 2011 at 4:04 pm · Reply

    Great post – I don’t have a mouse in the house, however have to bookmark this…just in case ;)

  12. Rhonda Uretzky October 5, 2011 at 4:50 pm · Reply

    Eeek, a mouse! What is it about these unassumingly furry little creatures that inspires such horror? Last time I saw one, I was sitting at my basement office desk so I did the only thing I could: I picked my feet up off the floor, sat paralyzed, and began talking out loud: “Ok little critter….here’s the deal: you stay out of sight and I won’t bother you…but PLEASE don’t let me see you again.” Later I found that my dog had no such agreement with the mouse; I had to have someone scrape him off the mudroom floor. I warned him though….

  13. Ingrid October 6, 2011 at 12:44 am · Reply

    Eek! TMI!!! I hate anything creepy crawling! LOL!

  14. Rob Russo October 6, 2011 at 12:54 am · Reply

    Thanks for the comments, everyone. Hopefully this blog post won’t come in handy! But I thought Laurie did a great job compiling all of this information just in case.

  15. Dr. Daisy Sutherland October 6, 2011 at 7:50 am · Reply

    A very timely post. I will be bookmarking this one! My hubby has been battling the little boogers for months…and somehow they keep winning..Ugh!! Thanks so much for sharing these tips:)

  16. Susan Preston October 6, 2011 at 9:52 am · Reply

    These were great tips shared by Laurie. I will have to bookmark this, just in the event that we ever do have mice. Thanks, Rob!

  17. Norma Doiron@Health, Wellness & Weight Loss October 6, 2011 at 10:27 am · Reply

    Oh my… I will have to get my hubby to read this article! No way am I going after a mouse… (-_-)
    Great Article!
    Norma Doiron @The LEARNED Preneur ╰☆╮

  18. Betty Nelson October 6, 2011 at 6:27 pm · Reply

    This is so timely this time of the year…..thanks so much……

  19. Michele October 7, 2011 at 9:18 pm · Reply

    I will save this. We have mice and always have a terrible time getting rid of them. Everyone in my neighborhood complains about them.

  20. Laurie November 6, 2011 at 7:12 pm · Reply

    Thanks for all your feedback, folks. Guess what I saw in the basement yesterday? I think it was vole, not a mouse, and it must have gotten in when a door was left open, but I’ll be clearing the basement with the boys this week going on a hunt to clear out all hiding places.

  21. Kathy December 8, 2011 at 8:03 pm · Reply

    My cats got old and stopped catching the mice about the same time my husband got cancer, sooooooo while we were fighting cancer the mice moved in. We have done the traps and now put down poison. I just found a storage of sunflower seeds in one place (we used to feed birds) and a storage of the poison in another! They took the poison and moved it! I can’t believe it! I did not know about the boxes so next project is to get rid of all boxes. I feel like I need to hire someone to come take them away, but money is tight. They are not in my kitchen any more so that is a good thing, but the battle goes on in the basement and garage. My husband’s motorcycle air filter had a nest and the dry cat food in it! HELP!

  22. jer January 24, 2012 at 2:10 pm · Reply

    never had a mouse problem ever, but i have seen a small mouse in my kitchen in my apartment twice in the past week.. The droppings i find are few and far between and they are pure white, look like large sized rice and are hard like chalk. what am i dealing with here? is theres some other small rodent like a gerbil or hamster or something that produces hard white droppings?

    the first time i saw it it was approx midnight and it was dark and i wasnt sure if i was really seeing it. i panicked and the next day put a regular trap baited with peanut butter in the spot where i saw it. left it there for a few days. caught nothing. i decided i was seeing things, and that the hard white droppings were from something other than a rodent, perhaps an insect. a friend was coming over so i put the trap away.

    then last night i went to my kitchen at approx midnight, flicked on the light and went to the sink to get some water. i turned around and saw the mouse dart super fast from a radiator to the side of the fridge which is in the corner of the room. i freaked out. quickly got the trap i put away which was still baited, and baited the second trap with peanut butter and some chocolate granola. i could see him watching me from the back of the fridge. i set the two of them up at opposite sides of the fridge so when he came out he would get it, snapping them each several times in the process because they are so goddamn sensitive. finally i placed them perpendicular to the wall, turned off the light and went to bed.

    no catch so far. i am not a religious man, but i pray that the traps caught him today while im at work.

    here are my theories. 1) he came in our christmas tree 2) he came in through an open window while they were open because the heats so high in my building 3) while work was being done in the basement of my building last monday he was chased away by the work and noise and ended up in my place.

  23. jer February 8, 2012 at 3:08 pm · Reply

    after waiting a couple of weeks and having set out traditional traps, snap traps made out of plastic, and spin traps i finally made the catch last night, not with a mouse trap, but with a glue trap sold for roaches.

    i had a package of them leftover under my kitchen sink from a few summers ago when waterbugs were becoming a little too numerous. never caught one though.

    glad i hung onto them and put them out a week ago, because this morning the little bastard was stuck to one of them. i couldnt handle killing him, so using a glove i put the glue trap into a plastic bag, tied it closed and then put it into another plastic bag also tied closed and brought him out to the trash.

    The oddest part of the whole scenario? exclusively white droppings. makes no sense to me. what the hell was he eating? because he sure as hell wasnt eating any food.

    • sabrina December 14, 2013 at 12:52 am · Reply

      They eat sheetrock..

  24. Anonymous March 18, 2012 at 4:14 am · Reply

    use bread and catsup. its sticks to the traps so the mice just cant take the bait.

  25. carrie s May 22, 2012 at 4:00 pm · Reply

    Hi I live in a mobile home have 3 cats and a rodent of some sort chewing under my home. My cats are going crazy pulling my vents up and I have let them under the house and I still have the pest! I have put traps under the house and nothing. I have had a energy person under the house and he did not see evidence that something had been under there or is under there. Do you have any ideas! I have the whole thing blocked so nothing like a racoon or possum is able to get under there so it has to be a mouse or rat. We keep the outside of the house cleaned up so that is not an issue.

    • Rob Russo May 23, 2012 at 6:31 am · Reply

      Oh, Carrie… Seems like a tricky problem and I’m out of ideas. I hope one of our readers can offer a tip!

      Along the same lines: I was up late one night and heard what I would describe as rats running thru our pipes. But how would they get in there and what could I do? I was staring into the bathtub waiting for something to crawl out the drain. Creepy stuff!

      Thanks for visiting and sharing…

      • Kris July 24, 2012 at 1:59 am · Reply

        I had a baby mouse in my bath tub before, it was tiny, no way it got in there by climbing into the tub, it must have gotten in through the drain! I currently have a mouse that is very annoying and hard to catch, he sticks to my daughters room(which she doesn’t really use) and the living room(only places I’ve seen droppings) so I didn’t want to set up traps, but since my moms cat didn’t catch him, I think I’m going to have to set them at night at least and hope he gets caught asap!

      • Debbie August 9, 2012 at 2:47 am · Reply

        Could be squirrels, Rob. They don’t always stay after they have their babies for the season. They don’t normally get into pipes though. If you have city water, it could be rats. Rats have vexed humans for hundred, maybe thousands of years. They eat what we have and they like water. I have horses and sadly our last good hunting barn cat died of old age this year and the dog is gone too. Since my neighbors have chickens we’ve noticed an increase in rodents especially now that we don’t have predators.
        For some reason, I’ve caught more rats and mice in my horse’s water buckets than any trap I ever set. They lean over for a drink, fall in and drown. I find them in the morning when we feed. And we have to clean everything! Even caught a snake last year!
        Now that my cat is gone, I’m going to set some rat traps but see my comment below for the solution for mice!

  26. Debbie August 9, 2012 at 2:37 am · Reply

    This method is more for the barn or a garage but could also work in a basement or attic. It’s not one of those humane relocation traps but if you have a real infestation, you need something that will catch lots of mice in a hurry. Get a plastic 5 gallon bucket, drill holes through the top on each side. Make the same size holes in a beer or soda can. Cut a wooden dowel a little longer than the width of the top of the open bucket and make sure it will easily slide through the holes in the bucket maybe a little snugger through the can. Slide the dowel though one side of the bucket, then push it through the top and bottom of the can, then through the hole on the other side. Make sure it can turn easily in the bucket holes. Put two nails or screws into the end of a small board- your ‘gangplank’- so that they anchor the wood in place. How far you push the board over the edge of the bucket depends how close you want to get that board to the can. The idea is to coat a stripe of peanut butter around the middle of the can. The mouse walks up the gangplank, hops to the can to get the peanut butter, it rotates, the mouse falls into the bucket and it’s ready for mouse number two, three, four, and so on. You must put water in the bottom of the bucket and yes, they will drown. If using in the winter, you can add antifreeze but make sure it’s the kind that won’t harm your pets, just keep it from freezing solid. You can catch up to 30 mice in a night with this. They don’t build up resistance to poison, it doesn’t need to be reset, just add more peanut butter. And it works. Unfortunately, you have to look at your deed and empty the dead mice into a hole and bury them or scoop them out. For those who say, Oh! How cruel!, they are infesting your house, putting you and your livestock in danger, and mousetraps are just as cruel when they only snap a leg. Certainly not as terrible as the glue traps. Remember, secure the gangplank, add 2-3 inches of water to the bottom of the bucket or they WILL get out, and keep it from freezing in the winter. You may have to adjust the inches the gangplank sticks over the edge of the bucket to make sure the critters don’t just reach over and lick the peanut butter off from safety!

  27. Jess September 11, 2012 at 9:14 am · Reply

    This might seem a little yucky, but here goes!

    When we bought our new home, we were RIDDLED with mice in two months! Very very common where I live.
    I think pet mice and rats are sooo cute, but these ones are DISGUSTING!
    After continuously setting traps and Having to dispose of a dead mouse every hour or so, I found a much better solution!

    Heading in to take a shower one morning, I heard a furious but tiny scratching sound, a mouse had climbed into our bathtub and couldn’t get out! Slipping back down every single time! So that night, hubby left a teaspoon dipped in peanut butter in the bathtub,
    Next morning, FOUR MICE were stuck! He filled up the bathtub (they can swim, but not for ever) and after about 15 minutes, the mice give up swimming.
    Drowning is terrible but it got the job done quickly and after two nights of the bathtub, no more mice!

    We do this every winter now and keep mostly free of the pests

  28. melissa October 2, 2012 at 4:54 am · Reply

    I have mice in my bedroom I share with my toddler son since I had to move back home. My mom has always used peanut buutter but I use a fruit snack. Just a little bit of one and really squish it in the trap so the have to really work to get it out. Works great.

  29. Chad October 29, 2012 at 6:12 pm · Reply

    We were getting mice through a tiny seal gap in the garage. Once I caught the mice I put fake rubber snake in front of the place we thought they were getting in. Haven’t had a mouse in 3 yrs.

  30. Adam November 5, 2012 at 12:17 am · Reply

    Peanut butter is an awesome bait, but it is also oily so it also helps with their escape. I find that glue traps that are about a 1/4 inch deep are perfect. If they step on it they are stuck, the shallower traps they tend to get out of easy. It’s not a poison around the house and it is also a place that u are checking for the mice not sniffing out the dead body. DO NOT use peanut butter for glue taps because the oils make the glue not sticky weather u put it on the trap or on the wall next to it the oil will get on the glue. Mice are smart it will use the peanut butter off the wall and on the glue to get out. A plain tortilla chip will do it. Mice love it and it is not sticky or oily or stinky or becomes stinky. It works every time. Place a glue trap against the walls were u think u have the best chance of catching them with a single tortilla chip (like the ones u dip in salsa) right in the middle and break the chip into a size were its desirable but also small enough to we’re they would have to completely enter the trap with all fours to get it. Remember mice are smart if they can reach it with out touching it they will figure it out. That always works for me, I get them every fall and I am completely rid of them before the end of the year. I start catching them within 2days of placing the traps sometimes within a hour of placing the traps I catch them. And I’m frequently catching several during a week for about 6 weeks and then it slows down to the point were there are no more. Also blocking entrances for them to get in and keeping clean in the process. A tortilla, they can’t resist it.

  31. LISTEN PPL November 5, 2012 at 12:49 am · Reply

    1 WORD DECON FOR THE WIN WILL TAKE OUT A HOLE FAMILY OF MICE IN A WEEK / 2

  32. Tom Schroeder December 11, 2012 at 11:15 am · Reply

    I store bird seed and shelled corn in my shed. I also store our dog food in a garage. I hang the food bags inside of a metal wire sack called Grubpack. These Grubpacks are a strong mesh bag made of stainless steel wire. The rodents can’t gnaw through them. They are an open mesh, so air flows through, but the openings are too small for the animals and birds to get through. Perhaps these are sold in stores, but I bought mine on their website. It works really well for hanging pet and bird food away from rodents.

  33. dee dee December 27, 2012 at 4:23 pm · Reply

    This is a question – If i put out a box of decon in my laundry room and the whole box was eaten in one night does that mean there’
    s more then one mouse.

  34. Saruon May 7, 2013 at 12:07 am · Reply

    I and more of Cambodians have problem with rat and mice, now they are invading our rice, they destroyed our rice growing to empty fields! in 2011 we had bad flooding causing, in this 2012 we had bad animals cut off the fields of rice. We are too hard to live if we still have this problem with our rice growing. Even though, we had used poison, or traps and/or electricity trapping, but we could not deal with them, our crop still destroyed almost no harvesting has happened, because the field of our rice changed to emptiness!
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  35. Anonymous July 2, 2013 at 8:16 pm · Reply

    Poison is a bad option because cats eat the mice and don’t know they’re poisoned. JAWZ mouse traps are the best ive ever tried!!

  36. Tara July 25, 2013 at 2:36 pm · Reply

    small terriers are the BEST for getting rid of mice. they instinctively hunt and kill them.

  37. Jane August 18, 2013 at 4:17 pm · Reply

    Hi, After having an unusually wet sping this year, we discovered that we had a mouse in our home. We were made aware by our two cats who would sit in front of our stove and stare at the lower storage drawer. A few mornings later I woke up to find droppings all over my counter. We cleaned everything throughly and set a trap for that evening. We have in the past tried peanut butter but that did not work so we used a chunk of shart cheddar cheese. My husband would hold a lighter flame on the cheese, this would char the cheese and make a smell for the mouse. Sure enough that evening the mouse climbed up onto the counter, went after the cheese and SMACK! got caught in the trap.

  38. Steph October 14, 2013 at 2:45 pm · Reply

    I heard that if you put vinegar on cotton balls that it paralyzes mice. My aunt had one in her apartment and tried this method and when she came home the mouse was laid out by her door and could not move.

  39. Lilly November 18, 2013 at 6:31 pm · Reply

    I have been using Peppermint oil sprayed around all doors and around the edges of my basement also in the rafters of the basement…works like gangbusters!!!

  40. Lilly November 18, 2013 at 6:33 pm · Reply

    I have been using Peppermint oil sprayed around the doors, and rafters of my basement. After I sprayed I found two dead ones and not another sign of them until just yesterday…sprayed again and we will see if it works this year as it did last!!!

  41. Elizabeth November 25, 2013 at 11:57 pm · Reply

    All the post are very interesting and very helpful. I am from the Philippines and we have rats all year round especially during the rainy season. Thank you for all the help Miss Laurrie! I love what you do. The way to preserve herbs in particular is something I really want to learn how to do because Herbs are so many in my country. My grandma used them a lot. Unfortunately I did not have time to learn. I did not pay attention whichI regret up to now. God Bless you Miss Laurrie♥ and more Power to you♥

  42. Elizabeth November 26, 2013 at 12:02 am · Reply

    Dear Miss Laurie Neverman.. sorry I got the spelling of your first name wrong. I love what you do. Thank you♥

  43. Bhavana Mittal December 17, 2013 at 4:24 pm · Reply

    Yes we found chewed up box in our garage and newspaper. That’s how I suspected a rat. The poor thing was so scared and hiding inside one of the boxes. When we moved the boxes, it jumped out and ran. It used the same hole to escape as it used to come in. We found the mesh iron cover on an opening was chewed up in one corner. The opening is very low to the ground, so somebody has to inspect it closely. Which we did not. So good that the rat itself gave it away. I blocked the opening and checked other boxes. I will do it again in few days. I hope there aren’t any more rats in my garage.

  44. Summer May 25, 2014 at 8:52 pm · Reply

    Tootsie rolls work better than peanut butter for trap bait

    • Jes Russo June 5, 2014 at 11:40 pm · Reply

      Thank you, Summer! We will most definitely try this (and maybe sneak one or two for myself) :)

  45. Laurie July 25, 2014 at 4:24 pm · Reply

    Rob – I noticed a typo (years later). It should read “they’ll be right back in”, not “they be right back in” in the mini rodent ninja line.

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